Restorative Care

Crowns & Bridges

Crowns & Bridges

Protecting damaged teeth and restoring functionality; Dental crowns restore badly damaged teeth due to fracture, cracks and/or decay. Teeth that have had a root canal performed on them will also be a candidate for a dental crown. Crowns restore a damaged tooth by encasing it in a strong, protective material such as gold, porcelain or zirconia. Our crowns are fabricated in a state-of-the-art lab that allow them to be perfectly designed to fit with the neighboring and opposing teeth.

The Procedure: We begin with a diagnostic scan which is electronically sent to the lab creating the crown. A cast is completed to form the temporary crown that will be worn while the crown is fabricated. The tooth is then reduced about 1-1.5mm on all exposed surfaces.  Once the tooth is reduced, a final scan is completed. A shade match, clinical photo and instruction for optimal crown aesthetic will also be included and sent. At a short follow-up appointment (10 business days later), the temporary crown is removed and the final crown is permanently cemented into place.

The process is the exact same for a bridge preparation, most commonly spanning three teeth including a missing middle tooth.  The two exterior teeth are prepped as described above and a pontic (artificial) crown is created to span the gap. The bridge is constructed as a single prosthetic.

Complete (Full) & Partial Dentures

Complete (Full) & Partial Dentures

A denture is a removable prosthetic for missing teeth and surrounding tissues. Two types of dentures are available; complete (full) and partial dentures. Complete dentures are used when all the teeth are missing, while partial dentures are used when some natural teeth remain. To prepare for complete or partial dentures, a patient may require extractions and time to heal from said extractions. Delivery of complete and partial dentures may require a series of appointments that include diagnostic scans/impressions, bite registrations and wax try-ins.  All these steps are necessary to ensure a properly fitted prosthetic.

Composite Restorations

Composite Restorations

Dental composite resin restorations are more commonly called “tooth-colored fillings". These are a GREAT alternative to amalgam (metal) fillings. What are the advantages to a composite resin filling? 

They repair a broken or decayed tooth. Composite resin material has taken great leaps and bounds in recent years. It is designed to be strong enough to withstand everyday use while creating a beautiful aesthetic.The bond between a composite filling and the natural tooth supports the natural tooth and helps prevent future fractures. Composite fillings are more conservative of natural tooth structure by allowing the dentist to only remove the part of the tooth that is broken or decayed. Composite fillings can also be used to replace unsightly amalgam (metal) fillings if patients are looking rid themselves of "metal mouth".

Dental Implants

Dental Implants

A dental implant is a small titanium surgical screw that acts as the root of a tooth. It is used to support a dental crown to restore an area in the mouth where a tooth has been lost or was missing. Why should a missing tooth be replaced?

Outside of simply making you feel self conscious about your smile, missing teeth can actually create functional problems. Neighboring teeth rely on adjacent and opposing teeth to hold them in place. When a tooth is missing for some time, the neighboring teeth will tend to drift. If enough of this drifting occurs, it can affect how your teeth come together, decreasing chewing efficiency and creating unnatural wear patterns on the rest of your teeth. Additionally, when the jaw bone no longer has a tooth to support it the bone shrinks, decreasing support in that area and the adjacent teeth. This change in bone structure can affect your facial appearance depending on which teeth are missing.
Implant Placement: Dr. Moos begins with local anesthetic to numb the site where the implant will be placed. The tissue is then parted to the side by means of a small incision. A small pilot hole is then placed in the bone to guide in widening the implant site for placement. Once the bone is sized accordingly, the implant is placed in the bone. A healing cap is placed on the implant to protect it and the tissue is then sutured back into place.

Restoring the Implant: After enough time has passed for the bone to integrate and heal properly around the implant, it's time to move forward with the restorative phase of treatment. This consists of a final diagnostic impression and a follow-up appointment to cement or "screw" the crown to the implant.